A new study conducted by Univision has shown that Latino men are spending more effort, time and money when it comes to looking better for themselves and their female counterparts. Surprised? Keep on reading the following article from L.A. Times and find out the reasons for their behavior – The 18/8 Man.

Goodbye, metrosexual, and hola, vanidoso.

Increasingly, growth in the men’s grooming arena will be driven by the personal care habits of Latinos. That’s the takeaway from a recent study focusing on the grooming preferences of Latino men in the United States and Census Bureau figures that show the Hispanic population growing at a faster rate than the general population.

“That demographic is really driving population growth,” said Peter Filiaci, vice president of brand solutions for Univision, the Spanish-language network that commissioned the grooming study. “Especially in the coveted 18 to 49 demographic, where one out of every five guys in the country right now is Hispanic.”

Filiaci said that while past Univision studies have focused on understanding the purchasing power and buying habits of Latinas, the impetus for delving deeper into the grooming habits of their male counterparts came when traditionally female-oriented personal care brands started moving into the men’s space. “We saw increased activity – like Dove launching its Men+Care line – and decided we wanted to understand the Latino guy,” he said.

Results of the study, titled “Why Latinos Look So Good,” were announced in New York City in March and include the following insights: While Latino men use basic grooming products (think soap and shampoo) with the same frequency as other men, when it comes to the “non-basic” products, the behavior shifts. According to the study, Latinos use hair-styling products an average of 3.4 times per week compared to 1.7 times per week for non-Latinos, as well as more moisturizer (3.7 times vs. 2.0 times a week) and fragrance (4.2 vs. 2.9 times).

As a result, the study estimates that Latino men spend an average of $8 more per month than their non-Latino counterparts on personal care products, which is no small chunk of change. It’s especially notable in light of a U.S. Census Bur